Some time back there was only one way to run MySQL on the cloud. Setup cloud , install MySQL and maintain it yourself the hard thing is managing backups, handling replication failures, maintaining server. Then AWS RDS came along and can be thought of as a PaaS for MySQL – it hides all the complexities behind the scenes and you only concern yourself with the database and not the database software.

 WHY RDS:

  • Simple UI to automate backup , setting backup time and retention copies

  • Easy to restore backup snapshots

  • AWS will apply patches that are security and durability related.

  • AWS will manage synchronous data replication across physically distinct locations (Multi-AZ deployments).

  • AWS will create ‘Read Replicas’ (similar to MySQL Slaves) as requested for read intensive workloads for high availability .

  • Monitoring the compute and storage resource utilization of your DB Instance, for no additional charge, via Amazon CloudWatch.

  • Provision up to 3TB , 30000 IOPS

  • Secure

Amazon RDS currently supports the following DB Instance Classes:

  • Micro DB Instance: 630 MB memory, Up to 2 ECU (for short periodic bursts), 64-bit platform, Low I/O Capacity, Provisioned IOPS Optimized: No

  • Small DB Instance: 1.7 GB memory, 1 ECU (1 virtual core with 1 ECU), 64-bit platform, Moderate I/O Capacity, Provisioned IOPS Optimized: No

  • Medium DB Instance: 3.75 GB memory, 2 ECU (1 virtual core with 2 ECU), 64-bit platform, Moderate I/O Capacity, Provisioned IOPS Optimized: No

  • Large DB Instance: 7.5 GB memory, 4 ECUs (2 virtual cores with 2 ECUs each), 64-bit platform, High I/O Capacity, Provisioned IOPS Optimized: 500Mbps

  • Extra Large DB Instance: 15 GB of memory, 8 ECUs (4 virtual cores with 2 ECUs each), 64-bit platform, High I/O Capacity, Provisioned IOPS Optimized: 1000Mbps

  • High-Memory Extra Large DB Instance 17.1 GB memory, 6.5 ECU (2 virtual cores with 3.25 ECUs each), 64-bit platform, High I/O Capacity, Provisioned IOPS Optimized: No

  • High-Memory Double Extra Large DB Instance: 34 GB of memory, 13 ECUs (4 virtual cores with 3,25 ECUs each), 64-bit platform, High I/O Capacity, Provisioned IOPS Optimized: No

  • High-Memory Quadruple Extra Large DB Instance: 68 GB of memory, 26 ECUs (8 virtual cores with 3.25 ECUs each), 64-bit platform, High I/O Capacity, Provisioned IOPS Optimized: 1000Mbps

One ECU provides the equivalent CPU capacity of a 1.0-1.2 GHz 2007 Opteron or 2007 Xeon processor.

 To sign up for Amazon RDS

  1. Go to http://aws.amazon.com/rds and click Sign Up for Amazon RDS.

  2. Follow the onscreen instructions.

  3. Once you’ve signed up for Amazon RDS, you’ll be able to begin the process of creating your own DB Instance

To launch a DB Instance

  1. Sign in to the AWS Management Console and open the Amazon RDS console at https://console.aws.amazon.com/rds/.

  2. In the left column of the AWS Console, select the region in which you want to create the DB Instance. This should be the same region as the region in which you created your DB Security Group in the previous step.

  3. Click Launch DB Instance to start the Launch DB Instance Wizard.

  4. The wizard opens on the Engine Selection page.

  5. Select your SQL Engine ( MySQL / MSSQL / Oracle )

  6. Follow the Screen Instruction and set your required configuration

To access from Workbench ( MySQL )

  1. In the DB Security group set your IP in the allowed list

  2. In case of dynamic IP use wildcard ip ( 0.0.0.0/0)